Insight Wellness

Your Insight to Health & Wellness

Wormwood Herb

Mugwort is a perennial herb reaching a height of up to 1.5 m (5 ft) and growing wild in a number of similar forms throughout the northern hemisphere - from the Mediterranean to Lapland, from India to Siberia, and from Mexico to Alaska. Hence the Latin name vulgaris, meaning common or widespread. It is grown mainly in the Balkan Peninsula, Italy, France and the former USSR.
by AceSydney


Mugwort is a perennial herb reaching a height of up to 1.5 m (5 ft) and growing wild in a number of similar forms throughout the northern hemisphere - from the Mediterranean to Lapland, from India to Siberia, and from Mexico to Alaska. Hence the Latin name vulgaris, meaning common or widespread. It is grown mainly in the Balkan Peninsula, Italy, France and the former USSR.

It is also found in western Asia and North America. If it does not grow wild nearby, it can be readily grown in the garden, either from seed or from young shoots detached and replanted during the flowering period. The top parts of the herb, either fresh or dried, have a number of uses. Drying must proceed slowly, at a temperature no greater than 35C (95F).

If it is to be used as seasoning then the tips of the young shoots must be harvested before the small flower-heads open. The reason for this is that the amount of bitter principles rapidly increases during flowering, thus making the plant unsuitable for use as a culinary herb. The shoots are best dried tied into bunches and hung up in a well-ventilated place. The dried herb retains its pleasant aroma for a long time if stored in air-tight containers.

The common barberry is a spiny deciduous shrub up to 2 m (6 ft) high with upright branches and yellow flowers. When insects alight on the flowers they brush against the stamens. These curve inwards towards the pistil in the centre, thereby pollinating the plant. The fruits are bright red, fleshy berries that ripen in September and often remain on the shrub until late winter.

Sweet woodruff is used as a medicinal herb to promote the flow of urine and bile and ,tilso for its soothing properties.

The renowned Hortus sonitatis of medieval days recommends sweet woodruff for the treatment of all illnesses caused by heat' because 'drops of clew remain long !won this plant'. The dried top parts were already used in those days to give garments in the wardrobe a pleasant fragrance and continue to be used for that purpose to this day.

About the Author:

Secured by Siteground Web Hosting